Encrypt files in Dropbox Folder

Putting sensitive files on a cloud drive like Dropbox can be dangerous no matter how secure they claim their systems are. The basic fact is that any system can be hacked, it happens every day. If you are using Dropbox to backup and share critical files like I am the first thing you want to do is to setup two factor authentication. In Dropbox the 2nd factor authentication sends a six digit access code in the form of a text message to your mobile phone. While this extends your security it alone will not totally protect your files. In this article I will take you step by step in setting up a encrypted Dropbox folder using EncFS and Ubuntu. 

Step 1:

Install EncFS in Ubuntu

sudo apt-get install encfs

install gnome-encfs-manager

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:gencfsm/ppa

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install gnome-encfs-manager

Step 2:

Create a directory inside your Dropbox folder. For this example I created a folder called crypt.

Start gnome-encfs-manager and set up a new stash by clicking the + sign.

Set the directory to encrypt to a folder inside your Dropbox folder.

Set the mount directory wherever you want, the default is fine just don't put it in your Dropbox folder. 


E
nter a strong password with at least 20 characters and click "Create".


Edit the new stash by selecting "Stash" and then "Configure" from the menu and check "Mount on Startup" and "Save Password in keyring" to save the password in the gnome keyring.

        
You should now have your encrypted drive mounted, it will be displayed like a mounted usb-drive.

 

Importing the drive on other computers:

1. Wait for all files to sync on Dropbox.
2. Start gnome-encfs-manager and set up a new stash.
3. encfs-manager will detect the drive and import it.
4.  Set the mount directory wherever you want (default is fine) and click "Import"
5. Edit the new stash as described above.
6. You will be asked for your password on first mount.

Hagelin BC-52 Simulator

This software is an accurate simulation of the Hagelin BC-52, one of the most famous Cold War era crypto machines. After the success of the C-38 and M-209 as tactical cipher devices, Hagelin developed a cipher machine for high level military and diplomatic encryption. In 1952 Hagelin Cryptos (Crypto AG) introduced the C-52 and, as Devours and Kruh wrote, ’caused ripples throughout the cryptanalytic community’. The C-52 raised the security of pin-and-lug devices to another level. The machine had 6 irregular moving pinwheels, selected from a set of 12, and the number of drum bars was extended to 32, of which 5 where also used to advance the wheels. When lugs and pins are selected carefully the C-52 provides even in this computer era a powerful encryption. The combination of C-52 and the keyboard, denoted B-52, was named BC-52. Within short time the BC-52 was purchased by more than 60 countries and remains popular until today.

This very realistic Hagelin BC-52 Cipher Machine Simulator enables you to encipher and decipher messages, and apply the key settings as you would with an actual machine. You can select between the C-52 and CX-52 model, and customize the machine in various ways. There’s also a formatted clipboard and an Autotyping function. The program includes a detailed help file containing the enciphering procedures, how to set the machine and all technical details .

Runs on Windows™ 98/ME/2000/XP/Vista/Win7/Win 8 and on MAC with CrossOver, Parallels Desktop or WINE (open source).

Download BC-52 Simulator

For more detailed information on the BC-52 and other encryption machines visit the Cipher Machines and Cryptology page.